Shingle Point

Shingle Point (St. John’s)

1929 -1936
Operated by Anglican Church

Opening in 1929, Shingle Point was the first Residential School that focused on Inuit students. Operating in a remote location during the Great Depression, students at Shingle Point faced food insecurity, poor access to medical care, and overcrowding. Records indicate that at least one student who died at the school was buried near the mission, while some students who fell ill at the school were sent to the hospital in Aklavik. At least some of the students who died in Aklavik were buried in the Anglican cemetery there. When the Shingle Point institution closed in 1936, Shingle Point’s students and equipment were moved to Aklavik.

Northern Mission Schools, Indian Day Schools and Federal Hostels

In Volume 2: The Inuit and Northern Experience, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) noted that the history of residential schooling in northern Canada differs from southern Canada in several ways. Early Mission Schools, which aimed to expose Inuit children and their families to Christianity, were established between 1867 and 19601 and run by missionaries at different times during the year depending on Inuit seasonal land movements. In addition to Mission Schools, by the 1950s, only six Residential Schools and one Hostel were operating. After 1950, rather than extending the residential schooling system into northern Canada, the federal government created a system of Indian Day Schools and Federal Hostels, under Northern Affairs’ direction (rather than Indian Affairs). The government intended to integrate the system of Indian Day Schools and Federal Hostels into the public school system. Although the students were primarily Indigenous due to the demographics, schools did not restrict admission to Inuit, First Nations and Métis children. By the end of the 1960s until they closed in the 1990s, Indian Day Schools and Federal Hostels in the North were run by the territorial governments.2

Due to the distance between many remote communities and the schools, children lived in the Federal Hostels while attending nearby Indian Day Schools. In the Western Arctic, these were Large Hostels with correspondingly large catchment areas. Children were sometimes separated from their families for years due to the long distance between the Indian Day Schools and Federal Hostels and their families and home communities. In the Eastern Arctic, where Canada established Small Hostels, some parents moved off the land and into the communities where the Indian Day Schools operated so that their children could live at home and did not have to stay in a residence while attending school.

Although the history of residential schooling in northern Canada differs from that in southern Canada, there were also many similarities. As the TRC has noted: “Children were taken from their parents, often with little in the way of consultation or consent. They were educated in an alien language and setting. They lived in institutions that were underfunded and understaffed, and were prey to harsh discipline, disease and abuse.”3 The TRC also noted that several institutions, such as Grollier Hall in Inuvik and Turquetil Hall in Igluligaarjuk (Chesterfield Inlet), “were marked by prolonged sexual abuse and harsh discipline that scarred more than one generation of children for life.”4

As noted, Canada built many Federal Hostels in the north in the 1950s and 1960s. During this time, when Indigenous people residing in the Arctic fell ill, they were sent to an Indian Hospital or Tuberculosis Sanatorium. Although some of these hospitals were in the north, a significant number of people were sent to institutions in the south. The TRC writes that: “[i]n 1956 the largest concentration of Inuit people in the entire country was the 332 Inuit in the Mountain Sanatorium in Hamilton, Ontario,” and noted that that year “over 1,500 Inuit were undergoing often lengthy treatment for tuberculosis.”5

These differences mean that the search for and recovery of the missing children and unmarked burials for Inuit, Inuvialuit, Dene and other Indigenous families and communities in northern Canada must include Indian Hospitals and TB Sanatoria in locations that are often far away from the Mission School, Indian Day School or Federal Hostel the child attended or resided. If a child died while in the care of one of these institutions, government policy dictated that they be buried close by, at the least possible cost, unless it was less expensive to bury the child in their home community or the family was able to arrange and pay for the return of their child’s remains and burial at home.6 In addition, families were often not notified of their child’s death nor the location of their child’s burial; meaning that many families are still searching to find out what happened to their children and where their children may be buried.

Research into how many children from the Arctic may have died in a hospital or TB sanatorium away from the location of the Federal Hostels and where they might be buried, is ongoing. In addition to searching records and sites in southern Canada, this work includes research relating to Survivor testimonies about burials at Hostel sites. As this Sacred work progresses, this map will be updated with more detailed information about northern Mission Schools, Indian Day Schools and Federal Hostels.

 

1 Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Pensionnats du Canada : L’expérience inuite et nordique – Volume 2 : Rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Montréal, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015, p. 7.
2 Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Pensionnats du Canada : L’expérience inuite et nordique – Volume 2 : Rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Montréal, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015, p. 3.
3Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Pensionnats du Canada : L’expérience inuite et nordique – Volume 2 : Rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Montréal, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015, p. 4.
4 Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Pensionnats du Canada : L’expérience inuite et nordique – Volume 2 : Rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Montréal, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015, p. 4.
5Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Pensionnats du Canada : L’expérience inuite et nordique – Volume 2 : Rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Montréal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015, p. 80.
6 Scott Hamilton, «  Where are the Children Buried? », rapport de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, p. 21 et suivantes, https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwiuqcP9pcf6AhWmMDQIHd-JB3MQFnoECAQQAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fnctr.ca%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2021%2F05%2FAAA-Hamilton-cemetery-FInal.pdf&usg=AOvVaw0QPuw_UK8vtwzHnj9lwInr consulté le 4 octobre 2022; Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Pensionnats du Canada : Enfants disparus et lieux de sépulture non marqués – Volume 4 : Rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Montréal, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015, p. 134.

Pensionnats autochtones du Nord et foyers fédéraux

Dans le Volume 2 : L’expérience inuite et nordique, la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada (la « CVR ») fait remarquer que l’histoire des pensionnats dans le nord du Canada diffère de celle dans le sud du Canada, à plusieurs égards. Les premières écoles de missionnaires, qui visaient à convertir les enfants inuits et leurs familles au christianisme, ont été établies entre 1867 et 19601 et dirigées par des missionnaires à différents moments de l’année, en fonction des déplacements saisonniers des Inuits sur le territoire. Outre les écoles de missionnaires, seulement six pensionnats et un foyer étaient exploités dans les années 1950. Après 1950, plutôt que d’étendre le système des pensionnats dans le nord du Canada, le gouvernement fédéral a créé un système d’externats autochtones et de foyers fédéraux, chapeauté par la Direction des affaires du Nord (plutôt que celle des affaires indiennes). Le gouvernement avait l’intention d’intégrer le système des externats autochtones et des foyers fédéraux dans le système scolaire public. Même si les élèves étaient principalement autochtones en raison de la démographie, l’admission aux écoles ne se limitait pas aux enfants inuits, métis et issus des Premières Nations. De la fin des années 1960, et jusqu’à leur fermeture à la fin des années 1990, les pensionnats et les foyers dans le Nord étaient administrés par les gouvernements territoriaux2.

En raison de la distance entre de nombreuses collectivités éloignées et les écoles, les enfants vivaient dans des foyers fédéraux tout en fréquentant les externats autochtones situés à proximité. Dans l’Arctique de l’Ouest, il s’agissait de grands foyers qui couvraient de grandes zones de recrutement correspondantes. Les enfants étaient parfois séparés de leur famille pendant des années du fait des distances considérables entre les externats autochtones et les foyers fédéraux, d’une part, et leur famille et leur collectivité d’origine, d’autre part. Dans l’Arctique de l’Est, où le Canada a établi de petits foyers, des parents ont quitté leurs terres pour s’installer dans les collectivités où étaient exploités les externats autochtones, afin que leurs enfants puissent vivre chez eux et qu’ils n’aient pas à séjourner dans une résidence pendant qu’ils fréquentaient l’école.

Même si l’histoire des pensionnats dans le nord du Canada est différente de celle du Sud, il existe également de nombreuses similitudes. Comme l’a noté la CVR « Les enfants sont séparés de leurs parents, souvent sans que ces derniers soient consultés ou y consentent. L’enseignement est donné dans une langue et dans un milieu étrangers, et ils vivent dans des établissements insuffisamment financés et en manque d’effectifs, en proie à une discipline sévère, aux maladies et aux abus3 ». La CVR a également constaté que plusieurs établissements, en particulier le pensionnat Grollier Hall à Inuvik et le pensionnat Turquetil Hall à Igluligaarjuk (Chesterfield Inlet), « ont été marqués par des années d’agressions sexuelles et de discipline sévère qui ont stigmatisé plusieurs générations d’enfants pour le restant de leurs jours4 ».

Comme il a été mentionné, le Canada a construit de nombreux foyers fédéraux dans le Nord dans les années 1950 et 1960. À cette époque, lorsque les Autochtones résidant dans l’Arctique tombaient malades, ils étaient transférés dans un hôpital autochtone ou dans un sanatorium pour tuberculeux. Même si certains de ces hôpitaux se trouvaient dans le Nord, un grand nombre de personnes ont été envoyées dans des établissements situés dans le Sud. La Commission fait remarquer qu’« en 1956, la plus grande concentration d’Inuits de tout le pays, soit 332 Inuits, se trouve au Mountain Sanatorium à Hamilton, en Ontario » et précise qu’« au cours de cette année-là, plus de 1 500 Inuits reçoivent des traitements, souvent très longs, pour la tuberculose5 ».

Ces différences signifient que la recherche des enfants disparus et des lieux de sépulture non marqués pour les familles et les collectivités inuites, inuvialuites, dénées et autres collectivités autochtones du nord du Canada doit comprendre les hôpitaux autochtones et les sanatoriums pour tuberculeux dans des lieux qui sont souvent très éloignés de l’école des missionnaires, de l’externat autochtone ou du foyer fédéral que les enfants ont fréquenté ou où ils ont séjourné. Si un enfant décédait alors qu’il était sous la garde de l’un de ces établissements, la politique gouvernementale exigeait qu’il soit enterré à proximité, au moindre coût possible, sauf s’il était moins coûteux de l’enterrer dans sa collectivité d’origine ou si la famille pouvait organiser le retour de la dépouille de l’enfant et son inhumation à la maison et en payer les frais6. En outre, les familles n’étaient souvent pas informées du décès de leur enfant ni du lieu de son inhumation, ce qui signifie que de nombreuses familles cherchent encore à savoir ce qu’il est advenu de leurs enfants et où ils sont enterrés.

Des recherches sont en cours pour déterminer combien d’enfants de l’Arctique ont pu mourir dans un hôpital ou un sanatorium pour tuberculeux loin de l’emplacement des foyers fédéraux et où ils ont pu être enterrés. Outre la recherche de documents et de sites dans le sud du Canada, ce travail comprend des recherches sur les témoignages de survivants au sujet des lieux de sépulture sur les sites des foyers. Au fur et à mesure de l’avancement de ce travail sacré, cette carte sera mise à jour pour tenir compte des renseignements plus détaillés sur les écoles de missionnaires dans le Nord, les externats autochtones et les foyers fédéraux.

 

1 Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Pensionnats du Canada : L’expérience inuite et nordique – Volume 2 : Rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Montréal, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015, p. 7.
2 Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Pensionnats du Canada : L’expérience inuite et nordique – Volume 2 : Rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Montréal, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015, p. 3.
3 Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Pensionnats du Canada : L’expérience inuite et nordique – Volume 2 : Rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Montréal, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015, p. 4.
4 Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Pensionnats du Canada : L’expérience inuite et nordique – Volume 2 : Rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Montréal, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015, p. 4.
5 Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Pensionnats du Canada : L’expérience inuite et nordique – Volume 2 : Rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Montréal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015, p. 80.
6 Scott Hamilton, «  Where are the Children Buried? », rapport de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, p. 21 et suivantes, https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwiuqcP9pcf6AhWmMDQIHd-JB3MQFnoECAQQAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fnctr.ca%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2021%2F05%2FAAA-Hamilton-cemetery-FInal.pdf&usg=AOvVaw0QPuw_UK8vtwzHnj9lwInr consulté le 4 octobre 2022; Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Pensionnats du Canada : Enfants disparus et lieux de sépulture non marqués – Volume 4 : Rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, Montréal, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015, p. 134.

Click each image below for a larger view.

Cliquez sur chaque image pour l’agrandir.

Location One:
Estimated location, Shingle Point. Extract from: Google Earth 68°59’54.32″N 137°27’33.11″W

 

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik
Oblique Google Earth view of Aklavik mimicking the orientation offered in view B (photo by Robyn Stobbs dated 2017 (http://doi.org/10.7939/R3VM4398G). The latter was taken from an aircraft in final landing approach at Aklavik, with the cemetery visible in the centre of the frame. While details not visible in either Google Earth or Bing imagery, this cemetery appears to be immediately south of the original location of the All Saints Cathedral that burned down in the 1970s and was replaced with the current church (1), with the approximate location of former hospital (2) and Residential School (3) lined up along the river bank overlooking what is now the airstrip.

 

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik

 

Location TwoLocation Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik
Google Earth view of Immaculate Conception RC cemetery, Aklavick. Image C dates prior to ca. 2017, while D is a 2020 view showing significant brush clearing and expansion.

 

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik

 

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik

 

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik

 

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik

Image E is Bing image of possible All Saints cemetery area, with yellow arrow indicating oblique views A and B. The white arrow indicates the possible entrance (F) with a large sign advertising the burial place of Albert Johnson, who was killed in a famous manhunt in the 1930s. Image G derives from Anglican church records and is attributed to All Saints Cemetery, while Image H is unattributed but is included in a Twitter feed addressing children who died while attended All Saints IRS.

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik

Note: While scaled, it is not clear how accurate this sketch map is. The location of both cemeteries in modern Aklavik suggests that the community was more dispersed than implied here.

Also note that while both the Anglican and the Roman Catholic complexes are plotted, neither cemetery is. Both buildings are photographed from the river side, thereby obscuring the cemeteries.

 

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik

Photographs derive from Google Streetview postings, with red arrows indicating the reported photo orientation.

 

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik

View NE of cemetery nearest Roman Catholic IRS

 

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik

View E of cemetery nearest Anglican IRS

 

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik

View SE across the Aklavik settlement from the air. Building 1 is the All Saints Cathedral that burned down in the 1970s and is replaced with a metal clad building in the same location. Building 2 is the hospital, while Building 3 is the Residential School.

Number 4 marks the approximate location of All Saints Cemetery. Likely both students and parishioners are buried here. Other images reveal a cemetery overgrown with grass and shrubs, with a number of white painted wood crosses and white picket grave fencing. This seems consistent with some of the unattributed images included in the previous page. It also appears to be the cemetery where the body of Albert Johnson (the Mad Trapper of Rat River) was buried.

 

Location Two:
Immaculate Conception, Aklavik

Panoramic view from ground level from river flats along the front facade of the All Saints Mission complex. The foreground appears to have been filled in order to provide suitable space for the community airstrip. If my interpretations are correct the All Saints cemetery was located off the left side of this frame.

Additional Resources

Ressources supplémentaires